e s i o t r o t

Salutations! I am a wishful mermaid who has a dream to live on the sea with a pet caribou, Sasquatch, and a loving dragon, with a wonderful wife who lets me write all day. But of course, we will always have a night to eat borscht and pumpkin vareniky and pickled herring, then cuddle on the couch and watch Juno and Bare while sipping chilled hibiscus tea. Enjoy the butternut squashiness!
~ Sunday, April 20 ~
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(Source: visualpantheon)

Tags: MY FAVORITE FUCKING PAIR OF ALL TIME
226,075 notes
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jeffblimissylar:

i will always reblog this

(Source: beardtv)

Tags: seth meyers what a beautiful man
181,351 notes
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khaleesikun:

WHAT GUYS LOOK FOR IN GIRLS:

  • HAIRLESS
  • NATURAL
  • STUNNING EYES
  • SHORT
  • A LIL FREAKY WHEN UR ALONE
  • image
Tags: exactly
232,732 notes
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~ Saturday, April 19 ~
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valentinus-aurelius:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

an-amateur-roman:

an-amateur-roman:

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

THREE MORE DAYS

IT’S BREAD DAY EVE

HAPPY BREAD DAY

FELICEM DIEM PANIS

In honor of this day, I give you a Roman biscuit recipe !
MUSTACEI (= Must Rolls)

(Cato: de agricultura, 121)

Ingredients:
------------
500g     wheat flour 
300ml    grape juice (or young wine) Manischewitz works well.
2 tblsp  anise seeds 
2 tblsp  cumin seeds (I'd use 1tblsp, 2 nearly overpowered the anise)
100g     lard
50g      grated cheese (sheep's cheese would be best)
ca. 20   bay leaves

Instructions:
-------------
Pour some must over the flour, add anise and cumin seeds, the lard and
cheese.  Work it together until you have a reasonable dough.  Form
rolls, then put one bay leaf under each of them. 
(small, palm sized, hockey puck shapes worked best) 
Bake 30-35 minutes at 180 deg C.These are dense and dry but very tasty with wine! I've heard of adding yeast to     lighten them up, but I haven't tried it.

valentinus-aurelius:

interretialia:

lana-loves-lingua-latina:

an-amateur-roman:

an-amateur-roman:

an-amateur-roman:

NEVER FORGET

THREE MORE DAYS

IT’S BREAD DAY EVE

HAPPY BREAD DAY

FELICEM DIEM PANIS

In honor of this day, I give you a Roman biscuit recipe !

MUSTACEI (= Must Rolls)

(Cato: de agricultura, 121)

Ingredients:
------------
500g     wheat flour 
300ml    grape juice (or young wine) Manischewitz works well.
2 tblsp  anise seeds 
2 tblsp  cumin seeds (I'd use 1tblsp, 2 nearly overpowered the anise)
100g     lard
50g      grated cheese (sheep's cheese would be best)
ca. 20   bay leaves

Instructions:
-------------
Pour some must over the flour, add anise and cumin seeds, the lard and
cheese.  Work it together until you have a reasonable dough.  Form
rolls, then put one bay leaf under each of them. 
(small, palm sized, hockey puck shapes worked best) 
Bake 30-35 minutes at 180 deg C.

These are dense and dry but very tasty with wine! I've heard of adding yeast to lighten them up, but I haven't tried it.
Tags: FELICEM DIEM PANIS
2,015 notes
reblogged via classicsmatters
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thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

Tags: bread pompeii ballin
117,531 notes
reblogged via classicsmatters
~ Friday, April 18 ~
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adamsforthought:

dungeonsandpendragons:

commonly confused medieval weapons

a powerpoint by me

now stop screwing them up seriously or i will put a medieval weapon in your head

Tumblr is endearing me to being lectured at in Comic Sans

Tags: medieval weapons this is so great
34,942 notes
reblogged via finntastic31
~ Thursday, April 17 ~
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lesbianvenom:

seventeen magazine has officially lost it

lesbianvenom:

seventeen magazine has officially lost it

Tags: MY GDOOOO
104,056 notes
reblogged via surprisebitch
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multipack:

do u ever go to school confident in what ur wearing and then u actually get there and ur kind of just like wow well this was an awful idea

sweater vests

(Source: ihaveremade)

Tags: sweater vests
342,241 notes
reblogged via as-emma-wishes
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condorn:

do you think fish ever get thirsty

(Source: condom)

Tags: THIS IS A SERIOUS QUESTION
54,290 notes
reblogged via pizza
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twigwise:

vector-nyu:

twigwise:

IT!

ISN’T!!

BAD!!!

TO!!!!

BE!!!!!

CISGENDERED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

AND IF ANYONE MAKES YOU FEEL LIKE THAT!!!!!! KICK THEM IN THE JUNK!!!!!! WHATEVER JUNK THEY HAVE!!!!!!!!!!!!! KICK ‘EM REALLY HARD!!!!!!!!!!

It’s also not bad to be heterosexual, male, white, abled, or born to affluence or influence. You have no control over the circumstance of your birth. It’s what you do with what you have that matters.

YES EXACTLY

THANK YOU FRIEND I LIKE YOUR WORDS

Tags: i like that this does not attack anyone it is offensive to no one it is beautiful
102,507 notes
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